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Fascism

Film: Durruti in the Spanish Revolution

Saturday, November 19, 2016 -
5:00pm to 7:00pm

Jura is pleased to be screening "Durruti in the Spanish Revolution" - the first screening in Australia as far as we know. It's a 60 minute film by Fundacion de Estudios Libertarios Anselmo Lorenzo via Pacific Street Films, based on the book by Abel Paz. Sid will give a brief introduction to the events depicted for those who may not be familiar with them. More importantly, the film has archival footage from the time of Durruti and the working classes of Spain.

Durruti was a major figure in the anarchist movement, from his teenage years, the formation of the affinity groups and on to the greatest revolutionary event in human history – the Spanish Revolution. He always fought for the poor and downtrodden, and against the State, whether of the social democratic, fascist or marxist varieties. In the film you can hear the voice of his wife, and some of his companions.

Jura's Red and Black Forum is showing this film in this, the 80th anniversary of the Spanish Revolution, and also of Durruti's death on the battle front. The questions that these events present us, remain: social revolution or reformism, a world free that develops all human potential or authoritarian domination of all and the destruction of the planet?

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Mexican doco: Watching them die

Monday, September 26, 2016 -
6:30pm to 9:30pm

In conjunction with Ojos De Perro, the makers of the film, an international screening on Mon 26th September of the Mexican documentary "Watching Them Die: The Mexican Army and The Disappeared 43" will be happening at Jura.

It's about the killing and disappearance of 43 students in Ayotzinapa Guerrero (and other thousands of Mexicans through the years) by the Mexican army.

The government has protected the culprits and masked the truth, the journalists are trying to spread their independent work in Mexico and the world.

Doors open at 6:30pm with the screening to start at 7:00pm.

 

An amorphous freedom: an investigation into the restrictions that cage humanity

This guest contribution to the Jura blog is by Daisy, a high-school student from Blacktown. For her year 12 Personal Interest Project (PIP), Daisy explored notions of freedom, human needs, authority, power and the relationship between freedom and happiness. She drew on her own research, a survey, personal reflection and an interview with Jeremy Kay of the Jura Collective. We congratulate Daisy on her hard work and welcome her thoughtful consideration of the issues.

Interview: anarchism and the meaning of freedom

Jeremy was interviewed by Daisy, a high-school student from Blacktown, in July 2014.

"Hi Daisy, I've done my best to answer your questions properly, but briefly. It was very difficult! You've asked lots of interesting and challenging questions which we anarchists think deserve thorough consideration. In fact, that's exactly why we at Jura run a bookshop and library filled with thousands of books dealing with these questions and issues! I hope you will come in and check them out – you'll find much more thorough answers than the ones I've given below.

How to Make Trouble and Influence People

How to Make Trouble and Influence People book

Jura is excited to stock the second edition of How to Make Trouble and Influence People - a brilliant book on Australia's radical past. Copies available for $35. Mail order available - just email us.
 
About the book:

This book reveals Australia’s radical past through more than 500 tales of Indigenous resistance, convict revolts and escapes, picket line hijinks, student occupations, creative direct action, street art, media pranks, urban interventions, squatting, blockades, banner drops, guerilla theatre, and billboard liberation. Twelve key Australian activists and pranksters are interviewed regarding their opposition to racism, nuclear power, war, economic exploitation, and religious conservatism via humour and creativity. Featuring more than 300 spectacular images How to Make Trouble and Influence People has been published in a second edition by PM Press. As this edition will mainly be distributed to audiences outside of Australia all of the listings from the first edition have been put in chronological order and introductions added for key periods in Australian history. It also features an additional 30 pages of new material.

Praise for the book:

“I noticed clear back on my first visit in ’83 that radical Aussies fighting back seem to be far more tenacious and creative than most Americans—Roxby Downs, that damned Franklin dam in Tasmania, Operation Titstorm, etc. A far better way to heat up the planet than your lovely mining companies. So keep up the good work! A prank a day keeps the dog leash away.”
—Jello Biafra

“A fascinating recovery of Australia’s neglected past and a worthy inspiration to today’s would-be troublemakers.”
—Sean Scalmer, author of Dissent Events: Protest, The Media and the Political Gimmick in Australia

“If you’ve ever thought of speaking out about an issue or have idly wondered what you could do to make the world a better place, this is the book for you! Fascinating interviews, quirky historical snippets and stunning photos chronicling all the Australians who have made a difference and who have done so with courage, audacity and a lot of humour! Keep it on your desk at work for all those moments when you need some inspiration, a bit of hope or just a good laugh.”
—Jill Sparrow, co-author Radical Melbourne 1 & 2

“Fascinating interviews with Australia’s best troublemakers make for a riotous scrapbook covering our radical history of revolts and resistance.”
—Rachel Power, Australian Education Union News

“McIntyre has amassed hundreds of tales alongside dramatic photographs in what is unashamedly a songbook for Australia’s future culture-jammers and mischief makers.”
—Katherine Wilson, The Age

Miscellaneous: 

Crisis and Struggle in Spain today - film, talk and exhibition

"In Spain we have an anarchist movement that is more or less solid. It's like a rock with cracks in it. We have serious internal problems, but we have a strong movement of squatting… we also have a strong culture of music, zines, books, information to share and relationships between areas that connect lots of different people. We have a web." - Mario, an anarchist in Madrid interviewed recently by Jeremy Kay.

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