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Sydney Anarchist Fair @Jura

Sunday, December 11, 2016 -
11:00am to 5:00pm

Jura is pleased to be hosting a day of stalls, music, food, drinks, zines, books, films and more! Come to the anarchist fair day to learn about how local community groups are organising for a better world, and how you can get involved!

Also, it's that time of year when lots of people buy presents for family and friends. If you follow this tradition (whether joyfully or begrudgingly), why not buy a radical book, DVD, poster or t-shirt from Jura? Get great gifts and support your local anarchist space at the same time!

Stalls at the fair day will include:

  • Anarcho-Syndicalist Federation Sydney
  • Friends of the Earth Sydney (newly re-formed!)
  • Jura Books (new books, specials and more)
  • Refugee Art Project
  • Scarlet Alliance
  • Students Supporting Aboriginal Communities
  • Sydney Solidarity Network
  • Take Care zine distro
  • and more…

Facebook event

"Can You Hear Me?" - An Autonomous Women's Film Event

Sunday, January 18, 2009 -
5:00am to 8:30am

A night for women (including women identifiers) to celebrate creativity. women's history and cultural endeavours.

FREE vegan dinner at 6pm!

Screening of the film "Can You Hear Me? Israeli and Palestinian Women Fight for Peace".

Review:

Lilly Rivlin’s Documentary “Can You Hear Me?” Focuses on Women as Peacemakers
By Robert Hirschfield

Slag Queens, Moonsign, Queer Anne's Revenge, Heart Beach

Saturday, December 3, 2016 -
7:00pm to 11:00pm

Slag Queens are just three slags trying to get by in the quaint town of Launceston, Tasmania. We play garage punk, pop/poop. Our EP 'sad things you find on the street' is out on Nov 25th.

Moonsign are from Sydney and play dreamy queer electro pop mmmmmmmmmmmm yesss... https://soundcloud.com/moonsignband

HEART BEACH are from Hobart but are gunna be on the mainland touring their LP 'Kiss Your Face'. They play skuzzzzzz pop. Slags love ♥ Beach so it's so great they are playing this giggo.

Queer Anne's Revenge are from Wollongong and play killa queer punk. Fucking awesome.

Big thanks to the Jura Collective for helping us organise this gig and letting us play in their amazing book shop.

Jura has a safer spaces policy (YAY!) and we ask that everyone please make themselves aware either by reading below or checking our their website http://www.jura.org.au/saferspaces

Cheers, SQ - Clairey, Lucy & Gracies xoxox

https://www.facebook.com/events/1461479757214807/

 

Slag Queens show

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Fair

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The Case for Anarchism or why Hierarchy should be Abolished

This short work outlines the current state of society, the structure of that state, and the dialectic of hierarchy and anti-hierarchy and the conclusion of said dialectic.

 

When you look at society today, what do you see? You see workers and business owners, citizens and policepeople, policepeople and commanders, citizens and government, soldiers and officers, agents and agencies, renters and property owners, users and intellectual property owners, and so on. How did these relationships materialise? Quite simply, "primitive communism" led to warring tribes, with territories expanding, and stronger members of tribes oppressing others. Following the invention of farming and stronger weaponry, these tribes had a revolution, with the creation of the hierarchy of feudalism. The king ruled supreme, with the knights and lords and peasants all in hierarchical subordination. After a while, the bourgeoisie toppled the feudal hierarchies of the world creating their own hierarchy - haute bourgeoisie, state, petty bourgeoisie, proletarian. This bourgeois hierarchy has been in effect for roughly 200 years and continues in this class subordination.

Work for a bowl of rice a day

I did work for the dole at various places around Darwin a few years back: Vinnies, Larrakia Nation office (the Larrakia are the traditional owners of the Darwin area), and at the Aviation Heritage Centre. I had arranged to work at some other place I can't remember the name of (I think it was a housing co-op) but that fell through. I was angry about being made to do slave labour. I wanted to protest and resist it but I was on a good behaviour bond with a suspended jail sentence for political activity hanging over me at the time. I was luckier than other people, even though I certainly didn't feel lucky! I only ever had to do 1 day a week. Others were made to do more: 2 days, or maybe even 4! They sure seemed to come down harder on the young, and on those who complained about having to do it. At Vinnies I knew the person in charge from activist circles I'd worked in. Gave us breakfast with the long grassers (homeless people). This person was pretty cool and had us painting a pergola. I think she let us go home early and ticked off our names as if we'd worked the whole day.

Larrakia Nation was pretty slack. Once we mowed the grass in the bushtucker garden at the back of Royal Darwin Hospital. Another time wewere clearing infestations of the mimosa pigra weed along the banks of Rapid Creek near the university. I pretended I didn't know how to use the whippersnipper or brushcutter or whatever it was so I ended up just collecting the pieces the other guys cut down. As Larrakia rangers they were getting paid something like a proper wage, I believe. CDEP (Community Development Employment Program) pay plus top up.

I remember doing a bit of work in the garden at the Larrakia Nation office on a couple of days, and shovelling up dirt in the car park at the back another day. But a lot of the time we didn't have to work there as it was badly organised. We'd sit around talking for hours, waiting for someone in authority to tell us to do something. Those in charge never knew how many people who were supposed to be there for WftD would actually turn up. There might be 18 names on the list, but 6 or 7 would turn up. Or maybe 1 or none. A few times I showed up there to find I was the only one. Some guy told me, "You always turn up. But no-one else is here. So I'll just tick your name off and you can go." The Aviation Heritage Centre was a museum featuring a B-52 bomber from the USA, surrounded by many smaller aircraft and artifacts going back to WWII and earlier. I used to enjoy reading the info and learning history while dusting and polishing the planes and things and sweeping the floor.

There were also 2 Aboriginal women and a tall Sudanese man doing WftD there. The woman from WA said the WftD was demeaning. There was nothing much we could do about it though.

One day I wore an old t-shirt a friend had given me. He'd sprayed ANARCHY NOW on the back in red. I thought the writing had faded and was hardly visible any more. Unfortunately it was visible and the boss noticed it even though he couldn't make out what it said. He marched up to me and said, "You're not working inside with that on your shirt! What's it say? Wanker? Go outside and sweep the leaves out of the big carpark out the front!" (I thought, "There's only one wanker around here, mate, and it's not me!") But I didn't say that. I said, "I'm not going back outside unless I get some sunscreen to put on. (Because I'd got a bit sunburnt working out there before.) Boss man storms off in a huff.

One time he made me stay back late and help lift a heavy bbq into a dumpster. I hurt my back doing that. The following week I forked out $27 to see a doctor who thought I was faking back pain. (Good luck getting bulk billing in Darwin! They made you feel like a criminal just for asking.) Just so I didn't have to do slavery that week. I hated it. Had to do it another week instead.

That boss was a prick. He'd sit upstairs bludging in his air-conditioned office while the rest of us, paid staff and slaves alike, soldiered on in the heat and humidity. Once during a break he bragged to us how he'd bought a car, an old bomb, in Darwin for a few hundred bucks, and had it shipped over to East Timor where he sold it to a Timorese guy for $3000.

After I left I heard from my friend who still worked there in the shop and doing the guided tours, that they caught that boss with his hand in the till. The board sacked him but didn't press charges. I think I had to do WftD for 6 months, 1 day a week. Centrelink bureaucrats surprised me at one stage. They told me I didn't have to do any more of it. I thought they were mistaken but I didn't argue! Later they discovered their mistake and I had to go and work the remaining couple of days.

All in all it was a shitty experience being a slave. I'd always thought that if I were ever told to do Work for the Dole I'd refuse, find a way out of it somehow. But when it happened I couldn't get out of it. Not that I had the worst of it. Plenty of people copped it a lot worse than me. Aboriginal people particularly.

I heard of people in remote communities like Kalkaringi being made to do 30 hours a week work for the dole and on top of that getting punished with income management as well. If they refused this slavery they'd get no money. The government wouldn't dare try that on in a place like Sydney. They seem to use the NT as a sort of social laboratory and Aboriginal people as guinea pigs, to see how much abuse of people's human rights they can get away with.

In conclusion I can sum up my limited experience by saying that Work for the Dole is really about more than work. It's about power and control. It's rich bastard governments punishing people who are unemployed. It's class warfare, and race warfare. If people are doing that work they're not unemployed and should at least be paid award wages like anyone else. Anything less is bullshit.

 

Anarcha-feminist reading/discussion group

Over the last few months, a group of people from the Jura community have organised a series of readings and discussions in an attempt to develop our (pro)feminist politics. We have focussed in particular on readings on practical ways of improving our (particularly men's) behaviours and practices of consent, and on community accountability processes. After these meetings, we decided that our discussion of transformative justice would be enriched by developing our feminist politics more broadly. As an attempt to begin that process, we have chosen to read the book Quiet Rumours: An Anarcha-Feminist Reader. We are starting with the prefaces and the first chapter. If you are a like-minded person and would like to participate in this reading/discussion group, please get in touch via email or personal message. People of all genders and sexualities are welcome and we would like this to be a safe space. (In the interests of honest disclosure, we should mention that the majority of us who have been participating so far identify as hetero cis men, with a smaller number identifying as wom*n). Also, please note that this is not an open public ‘forum’ as such, but rather a smaller group with a commitment to ongoing discussion and development. Participants are all committed to turning up regularly (about monthly) and doing the readings.

Quiet Rumours is available at Jura for $22, or online.

 

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