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"Can You Hear Me?" - An Autonomous Women's Film Event

Date and Time: 
Sun, 18/01/2009 - 5:00am to 8:30am
Location: 

Jura Bookshop
440 Parramatta Road
Petersham

Contact Name: 
Katrina
Contact Email: 
tree.kneee@gmail.com

A night for women (including women identifiers) to celebrate creativity. women's history and cultural endeavours.

FREE vegan dinner at 6pm!

Screening of the film "Can You Hear Me? Israeli and Palestinian Women Fight for Peace".

Review:

Lilly Rivlin’s Documentary “Can You Hear Me?” Focuses on Women as Peacemakers
By Robert Hirschfield

Miscellaneous: 
Political Perspectives: 

Reportback: Reclaim Ignorance Rally April 4th

A counter-protestor calmly stands in the way of a man with a swastika tattoo at the Melbourne Reclaim rally - photo by Kenji WardenclyffeOn April 4th, a couple of weeks ago, I attended the counter-rally to Reclaim Australia (RA). For those that don't know what RA is all about it comes down to fear-mongering and bigotry. They oppose the "take-over" or "Islamification" of Australia by Muslims, they want Halal certification banned, and want Islam banned from being taught in schools, amongst other narrow-minded, and fear based demands. They don't let facts get in the way of good-olde scapegoating, and would rather stir up xenophobic sentiments instead of realising Muslims compose only 2.2% of Australia's population. If this is a taking over Australian culture, I'm not exactly sure what Australia they are living in.

In anycase, I attended the counter-rally, organised by some Lefty organisation, alongside a bunch of other anarchists, about 25-30 many of whom formed part of ANTIFA. We congregated at the George St end of Martin place from 10am onwards, and watch many people walk to the meeting point of the RA rally in a center square of Martin Place. It was hard to tell who was part of RA and who was an ordinary citizen as individuals, couples, or small groups walked pass us, but there were some that made it obvious where they intended to be. These people had Australian flags draped over their backs, or Australian flag hats, or shirts, or handheld Australian flags. I don't like to make assumptions, but I'm pretty sure these people were heading to the RA rally.

There were some people, however, that didn't need an Australia flag for us to know where they were going, they were notorious enough to be recognised on appearance. The first was Ross "The Skull" May, a self-proclaimed neo-Nazi, known for, back in the 70s, his anti-sementic aggressions; his assault of any opposition, for which he served repeated jail time; and general racist behaviour, all while dressed in Nazi regalia. It seems he'd smartened up in his older age, as for this rally he wasn't wearing any Nazi insignia, but even as late as 2013 he still clings to his outdated neo-Nazi beliefs saying that he's proud to be a neo-Nazi in this day and age. For the rally he wasn't traveling solo, but was surrounded by 5-6 well-built middle aged men, and as he walked pass the group of us he threw a few Seig Heils our way. We responded with a barrage of mockery.

Later, his neo-Nazi buddy Jim Salem passed our way. Back in the 70s he ran around with The Skull wearing Nazi regalia, promoting his racist and fascist ideology. Not surprisingly he was also jailed for assault and fraud, both of which he claims to be innocent of. Currently, he is leader of Australia First (NSW) and holds a doctorate based upon his thesis of right-winged radicalism. Unlike Ross, Jim was alone, but that didn't prevent him from hurling threats at us anarchists, claiming he knows where we all live. It's hard to say whether or not these characters will have any sway amongst the RA crowd, there is hope that they don't, but there are probably a least a few who will be swayed by whatever backwards, fear drenched argument they can muster.

In anycase, the RA crowd was composed of some neo-Nazi's. If the RA beliefs are not enough to be concerned about, then the mingling of people who hold these beliefs with some neo-Nazi's should make one alarmed. However, as I looked upon the crowd from the distance through the lines of police I could see an Aboriginal flag, and even an Israeli flag, both of which would offend Jim and Ross. Perhaps, there's enough memory of Nazism, to prevent any spread of it, however, the spread of bigotry and racism, doesn't need neo-Nazism and seems to be moving along fine with RA.

Not long after the RA started we decide to go to the actual counter rally that was held a few blocks away from Martin Place, where noone from any of the rallies could hear or even see each other and therefore have no effect whatsoever on each other. We got there at the tail end of the speakers, and, to my surprise, the organiser of the counter-rally put to vote whether we wanted to march to Martin Place or not. It was a resounding yes. However, as soon as we started to move the cops closed in a tight line, preventing us from moving down Phillip St. That didn't perturb us, the entire crowd quickly turned around and started to march down Macquarie St, much to the chagrin of the police, many of whom bolted ahead of us.

By the time I got to the top-end of Martin Place a line of police had formed, not just foot-soldiers, but police on horseback and beyond the line I saw a protesters being pushed and dragged back beyond the police line. They must've made it up there before the majority of the police formed the line. There was a few attempts to break through the line, but it was met with brute force by the police. It was before this line of police that we started to chant various phrases to vocalise our displeasure with the likes of RA, and it was also before this line that it started to rain.
So, there we stood, in the rain, chanting in front of the police, intentions set on the RA rally. I'm not sure if they heard us, or even saw us, there was a few more lines of police closer to the RA rally. I walked along the line, taking some photos, wondering why the foot-soldiers had no wet whether gear, how much they were getting paid to on this holiday Saturday, and where they'd rather be than in the rain, protecting a bunch of bigots from some lefties.

This seemed to be the climax of the counter rally. After this most of the attendants made their way back to the spot of the speakers, and mulled around a bit under cover, cops watchful and standing in the rain. Eventually most people left, while a bunch of ANTIFA discussed a strategy to confront RA via Martin Place. After a bit of discuss we broke off in groups, and caught a train to Martin Place, however, by the time we got there the RA had dispersed though I'm sure I saw many making their way down the escalators to catch a train, who gave us a curious stare.
In the end there was no direct confrontation with any of the RA rally attendants on the cold, rainy day, but there were many confrontations with police. For this final strategy, they shooed us away from the RA rally site, down Phillip St, and continued to follow us for a few blocks until we got to Georgy St. It was about this time that I decided to part ways from the small group that was continually being pushed away from the Martin Place area by police. I'm not exactly sure by what legal authority they could do that, they claimed a "move on order" or something of the like as we were a danger to public peace. In anycase, I moved on by my own volition back to the train station and home.

It wasn't an uneventful event, but it wasn't exactly climatic. I'm not sure what I was expecting, nor am I sure of what tactics could've been used. The ANTIFA crew seemed to have a few alternative ideas as to what to do, and how to approach it, but it the long run I'm curious what strategies can be used to not only confront this bigoted culture head-on, but also how to inspire change so the ANTIFA wouldn't be required to start with. That, however, sounds like a long term goal.

Support the Redfern Aboriginal Tent Embassy

The Redfern Aboriginal Tent Embassy was established 10 months ago to oppose the removal of Aboriginal people from Redfern. Jura supports the Embassy their campaign for affordable housing for Aboriginal people in the area. We support justice and self-determination for Aboriginal people; being pushed out of inner city areas to make way for wealthy non-Aboriginal people is not justice.

The Block, where the embassy is situated is legally owned by the Aboriginal Housing Company (AHC), headed by Mick Mundine. The original plan was for AHC to turn it into a modern, affordable housing project for Aboriginal people. However now the AHC, along with development company DeiCorp, plan to gentrify the area with their Pemulwuy Project. 14 of the 17 storeys are designated as student housing and a commercial shopping area. DeiCorp controversially said in an advertisement, "The Aboriginals [sic] have already moved out, now Redfern is the last virgin suburb close to city, it will have great potential for the capital growth in the near future".

The Pemulwuy Project is a departure from the AHC's mission of looking after the housing needs of less well off indigenous people. Asked by the Sydney Morning Herald whether the development would provide affordable housing to Aboriginal people, Mundine said, "That's on the backburner at the moment. Our first priority is the commercial build".

The Embassy is now under constant threat of eviction. Aunty Jenny, one of the elders of the embassy, has asked for people to commit to a shift there. Many supporters, including activists from Black Rose and Jura have gone in response. We encourage you to go and camp there if you can. If you're not able to camp, please consider making a donation as per the details below.

For more info, check out this recent article from New Matilda, the message below from supporters, or the Embassy's facebook page.

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A message from supporters of the Redfern Aboriginal Tent Embassy:

"It's crunch time for the embassy. Its enemies are watching, waiting and working out the best time for eviction. 4 - 6am seems a likely time for them to move in for the attack. Being the cowards that they are, they'll wait for a time when there are perhaps only 2 or 3 women present. If they do act at such a time it won't be too hard to get those 2 or 3 people arrested, then that'll be it for the embassy. The developers will then be able to get to work putting up their 17 storey building.

The embassy was established nearly 10 months ago now, on 26 May 2014. It continues to exist because of widespread community support, which has been much appreciated.

Nevertheless it's hard to maintain vigilance 24/7 indefinitely. The hard core of regulars is getting burned out and that community support has been waning.

Aunty Jenny has asked for people to commit to a shift there. Come down and camp there if you can. Particularly blokes. When the developers and their mates see that blokes are there, more than a few people, they're likely to think twice about trying anything.

Unfortunately, given present circumstances it's not an appropriate place for children to be staying.

The head of the Aboriginal Housing Company (AHC), Mick Mundine, along with development company DelCorp, plan to gentrify the area with their Pemulwuy Project. 14 of the 17 storeys are designated as student housing and a commercial shopping area.

The Pemulwuy is a departure from the AHC's mission of looking after the housing needs of less well off indigenous people. Asked by the Sydney Morning Herald whether the development would provide affordable housing to Aboriginal people, Mundine said, "That's on the backburner at the moment. Our first priority is the commercial build."

In an area that's becoming increasingly gentrified, the Block, where the embassy is situated, is the last chance Aboriginal people have to hold onto an area that gave them their first land rights.

The Block is legally owned by AHC. The original plan was for AHC to turn it into a modern, affordable housing project for indigenous people.

Please support RATE's efforts to get a guarantee of Aboriginal low cost housing for the elders and families on the Block. We are committed to non-violent resistance to the threatened eviction. Though of course we cannot guarantee that police and other opponents will be non-violent.

Come down, say hi, have a cuppa, meet the crew.
Check out the Facebook page or email: rate_2016[at]outlook.com

 

Donate to: Redfern Aboriginal Tent Embassy c/o Jenny Munro
BSB: 062231, Account No: 10433577."

Occupy Sydney 3 year anniversary; all charges dropped

Today marks the 3 year anniversary of the initial massive, violent dawn police eviction of Occupy Sydney on 23 October 2011. Up to Monday, 11 people still faced criminal charges ranging from ‘camping’ to assault police primarily from this eviction. The hearing of these matters was continuously adjourned due to an Occupy Sydney constitutional challenge to the ‘camping’ charges i.e. that the implied right to the freedom of political communication in the Australian Constitution should have protected the political occupation that occurred at Martin Place as part of the global Occupy movement. Sadly this case reached the end of its road last Friday when it was considered by the High Court of Australia in regards to whether special leave should be granted for the case to be heard in the High Court. Leave was refused.
 
On Monday, the 11 people with ongoing Occupy Sydney charges had their matters mentioned in the Local Court for almost the 20th time, with their matters due to be set down for a hearing. FINALLY THE POLICE DROPPED ALL OF THE REMAINING OCCUPY SYDNEY CHARGES. This result is a vindication of the dodgy arrests made of and charges given to these Occupy Sydney protestors, as happens extremely often at protests. These 11 people have had their charges hanging over them for ALMOST 3 YEARS as the constitutional contest of the legitimacy of the police actions made its way through the slow and conservative Australian legal system. One of these people took on the risk of costs against him from the City of Sydney Council and the NSW Government for being the main applicant in the constitutional challenge. STAY TUNED re word of potential costs against this brave person.
 
Members of the Jura collective would like to say congratulations to these 11 people on the outcome on Monday. We admire their strength and conviction in standing up for themselves and with each other for such a long time. We stand in solidarity with ALL of the people that stood up to the police and legal system to defend their ability to participate in Occupy Sydney. There were almost 100 arrests made of Occupy Sydney protestors over the first 4 months of the protests. ALMOST ALL THE CHARGES AND FINES that were contested by defendants were withdrawn by the police or dismissed by the court. The Occupy Sydney network is also currently working on at least one court case against the cops for a clear false arrest of a protestor – stay tuned regarding this too!
 
The Occupy Sydney legal matters remind us of: the limited protection in Australian law in regards to the ability to protest - both the Occupy Sydney and Melbourne constitutional cases have been useful in providing clarity about the (regrettably limited) scope of the implied right in the Constitution to the freedom of political communication. Having said this, we again learn that the police are usually extremely underhanded in their policing of protests. Ultimately they know that the charges they give to protestors often won’t stand up in the courts, but they arrest us anyway to criminalise, hurt and intimidate us and to damage our movements. Often the state succeeds. So we are reminded of the importance of organising collectively, including of legal support, so that we can look out for each other, push back against the state, and keep struggling FTW. Jura Books stands in solidarity with people struggling for a better world in the streets, workplaces, cages and schools in Sydney and everywhere.

Finally, if you are in a position to donate to the Occupy Sydney legal fund, details are below. Any additional funds will go towards other protest legal support funds.

Account Number - 51298S1
BSB Number - 802884
Bank - Maritime Mining Power Credit Union

 

An amorphous freedom: an investigation into the restrictions that cage humanity

This guest contribution to the Jura blog is by Daisy, a high-school student from Blacktown. For her year 12 Personal Interest Project (PIP), Daisy explored notions of freedom, human needs, authority, power and the relationship between freedom and happiness. She drew on her own research, a survey, personal reflection and an interview with Jeremy Kay of the Jura Collective. We congratulate Daisy on her hard work and welcome her thoughtful consideration of the issues.

Other Worlds Zine Fair

Date and Time: 
Sun, 25/05/2014 - 11:00am to 4:00pm
Location: 

L3 Central 28 Broadway, Chippendale

Contact Name: 
Other Worlds Crew
Contact Email: 
otherworldszinefair@gmail.com

Jura is excited to have a table at the upcoming first-ever Other Worlds Zine Fair!

Other Worlds Zine Fair Poster

The Other Worlds Zine fair is an alternative to the MCA Zine Fair and will have over 65 zine makers and distributors filling over 50 tables.

Jura: 
Political Perspectives: 
Miscellaneous: 

Other Worlds Zine Fair Poster

Poster for the Other Worlds Zine Fair 2014

Jura: 
Political Perspectives: 
Miscellaneous: 

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